Thursday, October 29, 2009

[UPDATED with WADA Code Details] Geoff Kabush - Trafficking in Drugs "sounds like a pretty good deal to me."

It's great to know that cycling still has professional athletes like Geoff Kabush of Team Maxxis-Rocky Mountain  who are willing to recount their days of trading marijuana for food with such fondness, that, even if he or any other athlete in cycling was found with marijuana in his system - let alone on his person - he'd be looking at his first ban from competition, and maybe some jail time depending on where it happened. Hey Geoff! You're not very smart! Bravo for encouraging other 15 year-old cyclists to work for dope and trade it for food. You ignorant fool. The only people possibly more ignorant than you are 1) Your Sponsors (see bar to left for listing of companies sponsoring Geoff) and 2) Cyclingnews.com's Editor(s) for publishing your happy-go-lucky little dope story where you wrote:

"...It really is a magical island even when you are not smoking anything like a lot of the locals. One of my favourite stories is from around age 15 when I was doing trailwork on Hornby. In exchange for helping out for the day I was given a joint; Hornby is a bit of a hippy island and a joint was pretty much like cash. I don't smoke and I was hungry so I headed down to the local gathering place, the Co-op store. It seemed pretty normal at the time that I just traded the joint with some dude for a burrito. Still sounds like a pretty good deal to me..."



Maybe when Geoff writes, "magical island," he means the kind of place that ADA testers can't get to for purposes of performing targeted tests. Anyway, Geoff, good to know that trading banned substances still sounds like a pretty good deal to you in 2009, one that you're apparently happy to endorse in the eyes of any 15 year-old cyclists reading your diary on CyclingNews.com... BTW everyone, you can follow Geoff on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/GeoffKabush.

And for the commentator who thinks that 15 year-old kids know the difference between weed and crack cocaine...guess what? There isn't any as far as in-competition prohibition in concerned:

Marijuana



Cocaine

 
 
Oh look...they're both prohibited in-competition. And as another commentator kindly pointed out (copying and pasting the information from the WADA Code, I would think), trading dope for work for food could involve you in scenarios that saw you rumbled for:

Article 2: Anti-Doping Rule Violations

2.6 Possession of Prohibited Substances and Prohibited Methods

2.6.1 Possession by an Athlete In-Competition of any Prohibited Method or any Prohibited Substance, or Possession by an Athlete Out-of-Competition of any Prohibited Method or any Prohibited Substance which is prohibited Out-of-Competition unless the Athlete establishes that the Possession is pursuant to a therapeutic use exemption granted in accordance with Article 4.4 (Therapeutic Use) or other acceptable justification.

2.6.2 Possession by an Athlete Support Personnel In-Competition of any Prohibited Method or any Prohibited Substance, or Possession by an Athlete Support Personnel Out-of-Competition of any Prohibited Method or any Prohibited Substance which is prohibited Out-of-Competition in connection with an Athlete, Competition or training, unless the Athlete Support Personnel establishes that the Possession is pursuant to a therapeutic useexemption granted to an Athlete in accordance with Article 4.4 (Therapeutic Use) or other acceptable justification.

[Comment to Article 2.6.1 and 2.6.2: Acceptable justification would not include, for example, buying or Possessing a Prohibited Substance for purposes of giving it to a friend or relative, except under justifiable medical circumstances where that Person had a physician’s prescription, e.g., buying Insulin for a diabetic child.]

2.7 Trafficking or Attempted Trafficking in any Prohibited Substance or Prohibited Method

2.8 Administration or Attempted administration to any Athlete In-Competition of any Prohibited Method or Prohibited Substance, or administration or Attempted administration to any Athlete Out-of-Competition of any Prohibited Method or any Prohibited Substance that is prohibited Out-of-Competition, or assisting, encouraging, aiding, abetting, covering up or any other type of complicity involving an anti-doping rule violation or any Attempted anti-doping rule violation.

Again, it doesn't matter if he smoked pot or not. He reports that in 2009, after all those years to reflect, he still believes it was a good decision and a good deal to do trail work in exchange for marijuana, and then to trade that marijuana for food. And as a role model for I'm sure dozens of eager young teenage mountain bikers, to relay this story to the world via CyclingNews.com is indicative of a high degree of irresponsibility - especially given today's anti-doping climate.

20 comments:

  1. Joe - I think you may making the mistake of drawing equivalence between the recreational use of a non-performance enhancing drug and someone taking banned substances to cheat other racers.

    From a moral perspective they're much different. Perosnally, I have no problem with the former and a big problem with the latter.

    And yeah, Jeff probably is undoubtlely being an ignoramous for his statements, but I'm not so sure that they'll make him less popular...

    Thanks,
    Burt

    ReplyDelete
  2. Burt, it doesn't matter anymore. We live in a Black or White world. There is no "gray". There is no "recreational" drug use as it relates to sport. And any kid smoking dope b/c he chooses to who then has to pee in a cup at an MTB race is going to have a nice little vacation from competition. And Geoff Kabush is an idiot for glorifying his role in what will surely come to be known as the Canadian version of "Oil for Drugs" - "Marijuana for Food".

    Sorry man. The Man is watching and in this anti-doping battle you're either with the anti-dopers or you support doping. Geoff seems to me to support doping, especially since after more than 15 years time for reflection, he still thinks that accepting marijuana as payment for work and then trading that marijuana for food was a good decision.

    And that would put him on the wrong side. By condoning - reaffirming - what he did then, he encourages others to engage in the same action, which, these days, is incompatible with elite sport.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Dude, you've GOT to be kidding. If you think that smoking marijuana incompatible with elite sport then you obviously haven't heard of the NBA?

    The bottom line is a bike racer who uses recreational marijuana isn't cheating other athletes. Furthermore, I don't support even testing athletes for drugs that aren't performance enhancing, unless you're also going to test the officials, the guys at the UCI, and everyone else involved with the sport in a non-competitive capacity. Whether or not those guys smoke dope has just as much relevance to the outcome of the event.

    Thanks,
    Burt

    ReplyDelete
  4. Motivation.

    That's the key thing in all of this.

    If the motivation for taking something is to cheat then you are cheating (whether you are successful in it or not), and I have zero tolerance for that.

    If the motivation for taking something is to seek an escape from the pressures of an everyday existence (I am guessing here but I'd place Pantani in this category) then there are issues that need to be dealt with; and hiding them and ignoring them, or living an environment where you feel that is your only option (Hamilton in recent times perhaps) seems to be a one way ticket for pain, sooner or later.

    Now, if you are just fooling around and truly using something for recreational purposes (he says with an Amstel Light within reach) then it is up to you to deal with the details of what is legal and what is not and the consequences of that. But, if you are caught on the wrong side of these, then I do not think that you should be raked over the coals.

    There, got that out.

    Now this is all independent of what his sponsors might think of his admission to this prior behaviour, but isn't it up to them to decide that? For all we know certain "questionable activities" might actually enhance an individual's profile and hence PR value - we all love a rebel right?

    ReplyDelete
  5. I didn't even see this until after I tweeted about J.D. Swanguen earlier today. This clearly depicts the problem with mountain biking and marijuana. For some reason the earthy environment of the sport seems to promote the necessity of getting high. Don't forget about another incident that occurred recently with former champion downhill racer Missy Giove and her 400 lb magical island on wheels. I've also been in situations myself where other mountain bikers tried to mention the topic during a ride to test my waters. Regardless of how you look at it, the guy is a complete moron for mentioning this. In sport so highly critical of drug use right now and in a professional position so highly dependent of maintaining a positive image, to say something so stupid, he must have spent too much time on the magical island.

    ReplyDelete
  6. PhDumbass,

    I completely agree with you about the image stuff.

    Thanks,
    Burt

    p.s., - You're a sissy for riding the trainer yesterday. Didn't you get some lights yet?

    ReplyDelete
  7. Burt, the recreational vs. performance-enhancing aspect isn't the issue. The issue is that marijuana is in the code. Therefore, it's illegal to take from a sporting perspective. Therefore, it's irresponsible to promote the use of a substance which, if found in the athlete's urine, will result in a sporting ban. And as PhDuane rightly reminds us...

    (full story here: http://is.gd/4HJH5)

    A former world-champion mountain biker is facing 40 years in prison after she was caught with an Everest-size pile of pot during a federal drug bust upstate, officials said yesterday.

    Missy "The Missile" Giove, 37, was nabbed with 400 pounds of marijuana, which she received from a confidential informant at the Hilton Hotel in Albany on Tuesday, according to a criminal complaint.

    Giove and an accomplice, Eric Canori, 30, were nabbed by Drug Enforcement Agency officials after they hauled the massive mound of pot around the capital area, the complaint says.

    "Drug trafficking can lead you downhill fast," said DEA Special Agent in Charge John P. Gilbride. "DEA and our law-enforcement partners successfully put the breaks on this drug-trafficking organization."

    After nabbing Giove, the DEA agents searched Canori's home in Wilton and found $1 million in cash hidden in a duffel bag and shoe boxes. They also found an additional 30 to 50 pounds of pot, a money counter, a heat sealer, piles of plastic bags and nine cellphones, authorities said.

    Giove and Canori each face a maximum of 40 years in federal prison and a $2 million fine.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Agree with Burt and the recreational vs. perform enhance, also understand that it is banned, but he was talking about a day when he was 15 years old, I don't think he was pro then, could be wrong.

    It's not like he said, due last weekend sheppard and I smoke an ass ton of the chronic.

    He said he gave a joint away when he was 15. And then you ranted.

    I get your point, but these little self admission blips (agassi below) are not how hte battle will be won. Except they may help the governing bodies undertand more, except I expect that Tennis let Agassi off back in the day due to the almighty dollar associated. And that in the end will determine everything in 'Pro' sports

    ReplyDelete
  9. Joe said:
    "The issue is that marijuana is in the code. Therefore, it's illegal to take from a sporting perspective. Therefore, it's irresponsible to promote the use of a substance which, if found in the athlete's urine, will result in a sporting ban."

    EXCEPT...Kabush didn't TAKE the weed. And he didn't provide or encourage another athlete to take it. He gave the joint to a hippee for a burritto. No sporting violation.

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  10. hey JMP - you're a freaking idiot!! Geoff obviously doesn't smoke dope. how boring are you - he was telling a funny story. get over yourself stupid. also, Geoff is an engineer and super smart.

    ReplyDelete
  11. hey JMP - you're dumb!! Geoff obviously doesn't smoke dope. how boring are you - he was telling a funny story. get over yourself. also, Geoff is an engineer and super smart.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Hey Anon 13:25/6 - Geoff is the idiot- he told a story in which he condoned, in the present day, the trafficking of a controlled substance. And he's a professional athlete! Ding Ding! Role Model - whether or not he wants to be one!

    It doesn't matter that he didn't take it - or that it happened 15 years ago or whenever. What matters is that today (or yesterday), he said to the world that he thought it was a good deal for 15 year-old cyclists to trade their labour for marijuana (an illegal drug that is also prohibited in and out of competition - including the possession of therein) and then trade that marijuana for food.

    Have you read the WADA code? Do you understand the implications for an athlete under the code who would do today what Geoff admits to doing (and saying it was a good deal on top of that)??

    From the 2009 WADA CODE:

    Article 2: Anti-Doping Rule Violations

    2.6 Possession of Prohibited Substances
    and Prohibited Methods


    2.6.1 Possession by an Athlete In-Competition of any Prohibited Method or any Prohibited Substance, or Possession by an Athlete Out-of-Competition of any Prohibited Method or any Prohibited Substance which is prohibited Out-of-Competition unless the Athlete establishes that the Possession is pursuant to a therapeutic use exemption granted in accordance with Article 4.4 (Therapeutic Use)
    or other acceptable justification.

    2.6.2 Possession by an Athlete Support Personnel In-Competition of any Prohibited Method or any Prohibited Substance, or Possession by an Athlete Support Personnel Out-of-Competition of any Prohibited Method or any Prohibited Substance which is prohibited Out-of-Competition in connection with an Athlete, Competition or training, unless the Athlete Support Personnel establishes that the
    Possession is pursuant to a therapeutic use
    exemption granted to an Athlete in accordance
    with Article 4.4 (Therapeutic Use) or other
    acceptable justification.

    [Comment to Article 2.6.1 and 2.6.2:
    Acceptable justification would not include, for example, buying or Possessing a Prohibited Substance for purposes of giving it to a friend or relative, except under justifiable
    medical circumstances where that Person had a physician’s prescription, e.g., buying Insulin
    for a diabetic child.]


    2.7 Trafficking or Attempted Trafficking in any Prohibited Substance or Prohibited Method

    2.8 Administration or Attempted administration to any Athlete In-Competition of any Prohibited Method or Prohibited Substance, or administration or Attempted administration to any Athlete Out-of-Competition of any Prohibited Method or any Prohibited Substance that is prohibited Out-of-Competition, or assisting, encouraging, aiding, abetting, covering up or any other type of complicity involving an anti-doping rule violation or any Attempted anti-doping rule violation.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Burt, you wrote: "The bottom line is a bike racer who uses recreational marijuana isn't cheating other athletes."

    The bottom line is that a bike racer who pisses a metabolite of THC in or out of competition is going to get banned. And Geoff seems to be tacitly encouraging athletes to take that risk. He's also saying he thinks it's a good deal to possess and traffic in banned products - which a single joint would be - and that will also get you suspended.

    ReplyDelete
  14. It's so bizarre how you pick on Kabush who hasn't done anything wrong in telling about a story in which he got rid of a joint he didn't want. In exchange for a FRICKEN BURRITO... WHEN HE WAS 15! He said in the blog he doesn't smoke marijuana.

    Did you know that Kabush has recently teamed up with the Canadian Cycling Association for a new anti-doping initiative? No? Figures.

    Your crusade against doping is completely hollow. If you really do care about the sport, why target someone who we all know is clean and does so much good for the sport? You are doing more harm than good with this bullshit red-herring of a story.

    This is all ignoring the fact that you are a proven doper and a "never was" in bike racing, who now only after getting busted now conveniently crusades against doping in hopes of retaining some shred of dignity.

    You doped, you got caught... move along.

    ReplyDelete
  15. do you guys have jobs? surely you have better things to do than pick on someone who doesn't even smoke 'the dope' (hes no Agassi). how do you know Geoff so well? you all seem to be drawing a lot of conclusions about Geoffs character from 4 sentences... also, how stupid do you think 15 yr old kids are, they know the difference between crack and weed, (and performance enhancers for that matter). infact you could also argue that Geoff meant that burritos are way better for you than weed, which is why he gave (not sold) the joint away. Burritos are a tasty snack, especially after a long bike ride... yep, it all about point of view. u see it how u want. lame.

    ReplyDelete
  16. "Did you know that Kabush has recently teamed up with the Canadian Cycling Association for a new anti-doping initiative?"

    If that's the case, hopefully the Canadian Cycling Association is reevaluating its relationship with Kabush, who has a worldview obviously incompatible with the current clean-sport movement.

    Why, if Geoff Kabush was serious about anti-doping, would he tell a story that glorified behavior that is both illegal and would result in a doping sanction if done in such a manner as to leave evidence for the anti-doping authorities?

    ReplyDelete
  17. Hey Anon 17:59, who wrote "how stupid do you think 15 yr old kids are, they know the difference between crack and weed,":

    I don't think you understand what the difference is (is there a difference w/ regards to sports legality?)...and why this issue is salient. I'll update the post with more information so you can see for your own eyes why it's bad advice to think that weed is any difference than crack when it comes to prohibited vs. not-prohibited...

    ReplyDelete
  18. Really JMP and all you anti-Kabush posters? There is certainly a distinction to be made between trafficking drugs for the purpose of generating income and trading a joint, on one occasion, for something to eat. I can't believe that distinction is lost on all of you. Kabush's story cannot and should not be equated to the former. Perhaps all of you should spend a little less time on your bikes and a little more time exercising your brains.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Wow. I am no doping advocate. And while I disagree with what appears to be an irrational persecution of Kabush (did he ever piss you off???), you can stop quoting WADA et al until such time as you verify if he held a licence when he was 15, or was competing in sanctioned events. And as for the whole roll model thing? Are you kidding me? I'd say anyone who chooses to NOT smoke pot is a pretty good role model.

    Trading a joint for a burrito = trafficking in illegal substances??

    How about 60Mph in a 55 zone? Street racing? Attempted vehicular homicide?

    What is your stance on removing labels from matresses?

    What a collosal waste to time. Go bug Boonen or something.

    ReplyDelete
  20. im starting to think there might be something to this crazy marijuana talk.
    the establishment calls it dope and tell us it makes you drunk like, yet many people do highly coordinated things while on it. swimming? surfing? downhill mtb biking? basket ball? all at the highest (no pun intended) levels. could it be that the demon weed IS actually a performance enhancer? are we non-smokers missing something? hmmmmm yo kabush! i make horrorshow fucking burittos..bring it!

    ReplyDelete

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